One Big Idea

For over 35 years, MAI has been serving writers, editors, and publishers around the world. Through our conferences, training events, and online resources we have equipped and encouraged more than 10,000 people in 90 countries. 

With the pandemic changing the landscape of learning this past year, we are increasing our use of digital media to provide you the tools you need to excel in your craft. One of the ways we are doing this is through a new weekly short video called One Big Idea, in which we bring you one big idea, as well as reflection questions to consider throughout the week.

"What Publishers Are Looking for in a Writer": What Is a Concept Statement? - Week One

Today, Andy Rogers, acquisitions editor and writer, begins a new series on “What Publishers Are Looking for in a Writer” from a publisher’s perspective.

Rogers leads us through a four-part paradigm for writers as they prepare their book for publishers: concept, craft, crowd, and character. In this first part, Rogers talks about the importance of a short, engaging concept statement, taking us through examples of other books with unique and compelling ideas and statements.

After you have watched the video, spend some time engaging with these questions:

  • As you work on your book, what is your concept statement?

  • Do you need to go back and refine it or create a new one before you continue in your work?

  • Who can you interact with who can speak into your concept statement to sharpen it?

  • Do some research on concept statements to get a good idea of how others in your genre have been stated theirs.

The “Four C’s” are used by permission of Jenni Burke and Illuminate Literary.

Join us next week for Part 2 of the series.

"Local Ideas, Global Sharing": How to Share Your Local Ideas Globally - Week Four

In Part 4 of our series, “Local Ideas, Global Sharing,” author and trainer Pusonnam Yiri concludes with three things to understand about the global platform in order to successfully share your ideas that were born in a local context.
 
As Yiri circles back to two important concepts–ideas are born dirty and we must take ordinary ideas and make them extraordinary–he concludes with sharing three ways to enhance your local idea in a global context: through speaking, writing, and consulting.
 
Once you watch the video, we invite you to reflect on the following questions this week:
 
  • What was one big takeaway from this series?

  • Review what it means that “ideas are born dirty.”

  • Review what it means to “take an ordinary idea and make it extraordinary.” What does that mean for you?

  • How have you seen the global context thus far related to your work? How does that need to be shifted?

  • What role does speaking, writing, and consulting have in your own life, and how can you embrace each part?

"Local Ideas, Global Sharing": Five Important Questions to Ask to Develop Local Ideas for Global Sharing - Week Three

In Part 3 of our series, “Local Ideas, Global Sharing,” author and trainer Pusonnam Yiri walks us through five questions we must ask ourselves if we are serious about taking a local idea and making it useful to a global audience and context. Once you watch the video, we invite you to reflect on the following questions this week:

  • How do you know that your idea is meaningful and glorifying to God? How do you measure that?
  • Who else has written on what you are focusing on? What makes yours different and special?
  • How is your idea a solution to a problem?
  • When you hear Yiri talk about the farm and the market, what ideas does that stir in you?

Join us next week for Part 4. One Big Idea is a media ministry of Media Associates International.

"Local Ideas, Global Sharing": Three "Local" Seeds That Can Translate into Global Ideas and Impact - Week Two

In Part 2 of our series, “Local Ideas, Global Sharing,” author and trainer Pusonnam Yiri helps us begin to understand why we must start local to go global and how we go about that. Yiri frames our understanding around three main areas: our local environment, our local family, and our local culture.

Once you watch the video, we invite you to reflect on the following questions this week:

  • Look around you. What are some ordinary things around you that you’d like to write about?

  • What does “local” mean to you? What do you appreciate about your context and community? What is challenging for you?

  • What is one thing you see in your local environment that surprises you or excites you? Begin to consider how that translates to various contexts around the world.

  • Which of the three things that Yiri mentions – environment, family, and culture – is easiest for you to try to capture into words and ideas?

Join us next week for Part 3. 

"Local Ideas, Global Sharing": Taking the Ordinary and Making It Extraordinary in Your Writing - Week One

In Part 1 of our series, “Local Ideas, Global Sharing,” author and trainer Pusonnam Yiri introduces us to the concept that “ideas are born dirty,” inviting us to take the ordinary and small things, refine them, develop them, and make them extraordinary and big. Yiri encourages writers to “take what is yours and make it ours.” Once you watch the video, we invite you to reflect on the following questions this week:

  • Look around you. What are some ordinary things around you that you’d like to write about?
  • As you think about making those things extraordinary, what excites you? Scares you?
  • When you hear the phrase “ideas are born dirty,” what does that mean to you?
  • Why is the concept of “yours becoming ours” important today?

Join us next week for Part 2.

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